News

It’s gold, it’s white, it’s blue, it’s…

As colour perception has its 15 minutes of internet fame with that dress, artist Gary Peters launches The Colour of Courtenay Place – a series of 16 bold, urban monochrome works, which encourage us to look more closely at the space and colour around us.

 Unlike that dress, there’s no confusing the colours in Wellington’s Courtenay Place.

The Colour of Courtenay Place is the first large-scale public artwork for Peters, taking his colourful work out of the studios and galleries and onto the streets.

“Standing in front of the light boxes at different times of day and night, I took photos of what I could see around them. Certain colours would catch my eye. From these photos I picked a colour to create the digital file and send to the printer to create the final monochrome,” says Peters. 

“Because of the different processes involved, there’s an uncontrollable slippage between the colour I see, the colour the camera captures, and the final printed colour. The colours look different again depending on weather conditions and time of day.”

This response to the surrounding environment is a key thread in Peters’ art-making – whether it’s creating painting-objects to the same size and dimension of the vents in his studio or, as he did in his artwork for the Parkin Drawing Prize, creating a mirror image work of the access door in the gallery wall. 

 Peters encourages us to look again at our environment, to pause for a moment and notice the details we normally overlook. These slabs of colour, devoid of text and advertising, offer us a visual pause in the busyness of the strip, and invite us to take a moment and be curious about looking at the space we inhabit.

“A friend visiting New Zealand described the colour as if ‘it had been turned up to 11’. After years in the UK, with its soft light and myriad of greys, I knew exactly what he meant. I think my growing up with the subtleties of those soft English greys effects how I see and use colour in my work today.”

English-born, Gary Peters is an award-winning Wellington-based artist who has lived in New Zealand for nine years. He has exhibited extensively nationally and internationally and has taken part in several residencies, including six-months at Sydney Non-Objective Contemporary Art Projects.

 Represented by Paul Nache Gallery, Peters has works in public and private collections including the Council’s City Art Collection and the James Wallace Collection. He also writes for Artists Alliance and is a trustee for Enjoy Public Art Gallery here in Wellington.

The Colour of Courtenay Place is in-situ from 7 April to 31 July in the Courtenay Place Park Light Boxes to brighten your day – proudly supported by Wellington City Council.

Three Oceans Project; Part I

clouds-31.jpg

I touched down at Bandaranayake International Airport on the outskirts of Sri Lanka’s capital Colombo on the fifteenth of February 2015, officially kicking off the first leg of the Three Oceans Project.

I have been coming to Sri Lanka since 1998 and spent a number of years (2004/8) living for five to six months per season on the south coast. Since this period, I have been back a couple of times but for only for a few weeks on each occasion. For this reason and many more, I was very excited to be back in the country I love for the far more agreeable term of three months.

As I have stated, I am no novice with regards to Sri Lanka and having made a fairly significant number of works here before thought I knew what to expect and had made the necessary arrangements… I was wrong. Sri Lanka has always been the kind of place that you love and that drives you mad in equal measure. Some days it is the best place on earth; others make you want to leave and never come back. So it has proven with this trip.

I knew that the best bet was to bring the majority (if not all) of my art materials with me. I left a few things in the hope that I may be able to get a substitute, but had a contingency in place if not. Upon arrival in Colombo I checked out a couple of the art supply stores I had been researching online and was not surprised to find I couldn’t really get what I wanted. I have managed to find a few things I can use but my search for stretcher bars came up empty. As it turns out I have since located a carpenter living and working in the jungle only a ten minute walk from my house. We have struck up a rapport and I can now order custom frames through him that are ready the next day. They are beautifully handmade and embarrassingly cheap.

carpenter.jpg

While this turned out to be a great result, the carpenter organising these things takes time and time is a luxury I can ill afford. From the day I arrived in Sri Lanka I had eleven weeks until the opening of the exhibition in Colombo… this is not a lot of time! Because of the ethos of the project, all of the work for each location must be made at that location, meaning I could not begin making the specific works before I arrived. While this is a tight deadline I know if I work hard there is enough time to produce a quality exhibition, what I had not foreseen however, were the problems and delays I would face when anything needed to be done on the computer.

Before heading over to Sri Lanka I had been in touch with a local friend of mine who ran an internet café just around the corner from my place. I wanted to check that he had Photoshop etc. as I didn’t want to bring the new laptop over for so long; the heat and humidity has a tendency to ruin electronic equipment. Nishan assured me that everything was fine and I did not have to worry. Unfortunately, when I arrived the shop was closed, had been for some time by the look of it, and of course Nishan was nowhere to be seen. No computer.

I eventually tracked Nishan down and he lent me a laptop. This would have been great if: A) it had not been so riddled with viruses that I could actually use it, or, B) the ‘wifi’ at my place actually worked. Needless to say the first few weeks were extremely trying at times, especially as one of the key components of the work I am making for the project relies upon me sending rather large files on the internet. This proved extremely difficult, even after compressing and zipping the files, and would have been impossible had my darling wife Bianca not arrived in Sri Lanka to save the day! She brought the laptop and a level head to the situation, two things I did not possess. Even with her computer wizardry it took four days to send a file containing one image where ordinarily it would take thirty minutes to send four images.

Although there have been trying times there have also been great times. It is always a pleasure to catch up with old friends, both local and returning tourists, as is sampling the wonderful food on a daily basis. I have managed to catch some great waves in between long stints in the studio and am excited about the work I am producing. With any luck I am over the hump and have dealt with the majority of difficulties and road blocks for this trip. As I write this, I have five more weeks until the first exhibition of the Three Oceans Project opens at Saskia Fernando gallery… watch this space… and wish me luck.

– Scott Gardiner, April 2015

WWJD? In Conversation with James R Ford

IMG X Tom Teutenberg @2TEN

IMG X Tom Teutenberg @2TEN

WW..D? Is an interview segment where we get to know awesome people that are a part of the creative community in New Zealand.

This week we spoke to James R Ford. James is a Wellington based artist whose work engages strongly with objects as critique of how we spend our time. James studied at Nottingham Trent University and Goldsmiths, University of London and has exhibited widely throughout the UK, New Zealand and internationally. In 2013 he won the New Zealand Academy of Fine Arts Tui McLauchlan Emerging Artist’s Award.

Click here to read the interview on #500words - ON ARTS AND CULTURE

Hypnic Jerks

PAULNACHE in conjunction with Evan Woodruffe present...

Hypnic Jerks 06.02.15-28.02.15

At last year’s MFA show at Elam School of Fine Arts, Woodruffe described his paintings as map-like, showing our own negotiation of physical and cultural spaces, looping between the internal and external worlds. His latest exhibition Hypnic Jerks continues to explore this dialogue between inner and outer, taking its title from the twitches that our bodies sometimes experience as we lay in the liminal state between waking and sleeping, often as a half- dream of falling or tripping up.

Hypnic Jerks seem to be a sign that the motor system can still exert some control over the body as sleep paralysis begins to take over. Rather than having a single sleep-wake switch in the brain for controlling our sleep (i.e. ON at night, OFF during the day), we have two opposing systems balanced against each other that go through a daily dance, where each has to wrest control from the other ... as hypnic jerks escape during the struggle between wake and sleep, the mind is undergoing its own transition. In the waking world, we must make sense of external events. In dreams the mind tries to make sense of its own activity, resulting in dreams. Whilst a veil is drawn over most of the external world as we fall asleep, hypnic jerks are obviously close enough to home – being movements of our own bodies – to attract the attention of sleeping consciousness. Along with the hallucinated night-time world they get incorporated into our dreams (1). 

In Hypnic Jerks, Woodruffe proposes both waking and dream states; the work stands astride the real and the imagined – the paintings are abstract yet reference the real world, with the trail of his brush marking stages, places and possible events. The brain processes the diverse events of our waking life by incorporating them into dreamed sequences, and similarly these paintings mix a jumble of cultural and historical signs into a surreal landscape.

The scribbles, meshes, and twisting lines lead to a number of associations: the rhythm of flax-fibre fishing nets and winding paths, tangled electrical leads, long-exposure starlight photography, and the fizz of static. Oblong swatches of colour, stripes and polka-dots allude to colourful modern fabrics: intensely patterned Liberty prints from London and limited edition sneakers from Vans and Nike, visual cues that suggest cultural diversity and creative confusions. Rough forms that interrupt the patterning shift at slower speeds, representing unfettered, floating spaces like that of interior cellular activity and the marbled liquid slides of 60s psychedelic light shows.

By moving each component differently – to float or scrawl, point or effervesce – Woodruffe creates a tempo and sequence that is both decorative and disorientating, the hypnic jerks that signal the struggle between waking and dreaming.

Hypnic Jerks will be the artists second solo exhibition with the Gisborne Gallery.

  1. Footnote: (1) Stafford, T. 22nd May 2012, www.bbc.com/future/columns/neurohacks.

For more information about the artist and his work contact the Gallery or visit his website: www.evanwoodrfuffe.com 

The Something Scratchcard Artwork Edition Golden Ticket Thing

PAULNACHE in conjunction with James R Ford present...

The Something Scratchcard Artwork Edition Golden Ticket Thing

Buy an artwork worth a little, maybe win an artwork worth quite a bit more. Uk-born, Wellington based artist James R Ford will be producing 100 scratchcard edition artworks in the run up to the 'Jeopardy' exhibition at the gallery in February 2015.

Each scratchcard can be purchased for $50 and, once scratched, becomes a limited edition artwork. One of these artworks will reveal the title of a new large neon work by Ford: 'Something, Something Else'. Whoever has this card will become the owner of the neon work and will have it delivered to them once the Jeopardy exhibition has finished (international freight at the winner's expense).

There is no limit to the number of cards you can buy. Place your order on this page (or don't if you are shy) and then arrange payment to PAULNACHE by emailing the Gallery. The cards will be posted out once the exhibition has ended.

Join the event on Facebook

PAULNACHE presents Peter Adsett at The Melbourne Art Fair

Room with a View @MAF, IMG X Tom Teutenberg

Peter Adsett in conjunction with PAULNACHE, Gisborne (NZ) presents…

PETER ADSETT
ROOM WITH A VIEW

PAULNACHE, Stand E125, Ground floor
Melbourne Art Fair, 13 - 17 August, 2014, Royal Exhibition Building, Carlton, Victoria 3053, Melbourne, Australia


Shouldn’t there be more artists today who could make us look at painting in terms of its co-operation with the surrounding architecture?

The view offered in this room is not the contemplative distance that we require when we behold figurative work.  These abstract paintings are without the perspectival trajectories that focus the eye on central point. And they don’t ‘stay’ inside their frames.  Instead, the elements of the painting closely interact with the wall – and in fact, with all the architectural elements.  

The MAF gallery walls have been treated in such a way as to make this idea inescapable.  Torn wallpaper speaks to collage elements in the work, while holes and raw linen acknowledge the wall behind.  Black paint does what it has to in working against shadow and depth.  Layers of material peel away to expose undersides and reverses.  All the works, walls included, are in an ongoing process of exposure. 

Peter Adsett has challenged our perception in confusing the ground of painting.  Wall, linen, paper and paint all compete to be identified as ground or figure.  In the end we conclude that the only ground is the one where we stand.  So the perspective we attain is actually one we are inside.

Mary Alice Lee


ROOM WITH A VIEW: A CONVERSATION BETWEEN ARTIST PETER ADSETT, ARCHITECT SAM KEBBELL AND ART HISTORIAN MARY ALICE LEE
SATURDAY 16 AUGUST 11AM | ART, TALKS AND WALKS
Melbourne Art Fair ticket holders.
In 2009, NZ-born, Melbourne based painter Peter Adsett collaborated with NZ architect Sam Kebbell to build ‘Humbug’ studio/house, creating a “dialogue between painting and architecture.” This is the direction currently being explored in Adsett’s site specific installation and works exhibited at the Fair.
Royal Exhibition Building, Stand E125

ARTIST STUDIO AND PRIVATE COLLECTION TOUR: PAULNACHE PRESENTS PETER ADSETT'S HUMBUG
SUNDAY 17 AUGUST | 9:30AM -12:30PM

Collector Pass holders only. Login to RSVP.
Join this private collection and artist studio tour of Humbug House, a collaboration between Peter Adsett (artist), Sam Kebbell (Kebbell Daish Architects) and Mary Alice Lee (art historian/ writer), and discover how architecture and painting create a dialogue to something extraordinary.

Read Matt Ward's review in Australian Design Review


Biography

Born in Gisborne, New Zealand, in 1959, Peter Adsett has lived and worked in Australia since 1982, developing his painting practice. He exhibits regularly in both countries, and has had shows overseas in New York and Boston. 

His academic credentials include an MFA from the Northern Territory University, and a PhD from Australian National University. In 2001 he was awarded a grant from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation and enjoyed residencies in the International Studio and Curatorial Program in New York, and the McDowell Colony in New Hampshire. Adsett’s work is held in institutions and museums in Australia, New Zealand and Japan.

Adsett has devoted twenty years now to an investigation of abstraction, and like such iconic figures as Richard Serra and Robert Ryman, he proves the enterprise to be one of great, untapped potential. One could even view Adsett’s art as a critique of abstract painting from the early 20th century to today, a task that became further complicated when he confronted the art of Indigenous Australians - what many believe is the most powerful painting produced today.

In 2000 he completed a series of large-scale acrylic paintings in collaboration with the Gija artist, Rusty Peters. The resulting exhibition of fourteen works (seven each), titled Two Laws, One Big Spirit travelled around Australia and New Zealand.

In 2009, Adsett built a house/studio in southern Victoria that was the fruit of another collaboration, this time with a New Zealand architect, Sam Kebbell. The innovative and much admired building (now housing Adsett and his family) is regarded as a “dialogue between painting and architecture.” 

This is the direction currently being explored in the works for the 2014 Melbourne Art Fair. Whilst he would maintain that his paintings always “take on the wall”, Adsett’s recent work engages with this proposition explicitly. Furthermore, in Room with a View the viewer will discover a degree of wit and humour, latent in much of his earlier work, but now coming to the fore with zest.


View an advanced preview of the exhibition online or request a list of works by clicking HERE.

Tickets to the Vernissage and day tickets can still be purchased HERE

Catalogues will be accessible to those attending the fair, however copies may be requested following the event. Please contact the Gallery for further information. 

We look forward to seeing you all at the Melbourne Art Fair

Prepare for the best...

The Melbourne Art Fair is one of Australasia’s leading contemporary art events, showcasing outstanding work from the region’s best galleries.

During its 25 year history, the Fair has helped stimulate critical and commercial attention for prominent galleries and their artists, presenting a rich and diverse cross-section of the region’s visual art scene and directly contributing to the livelihood of living artists.

The 2014 Melbourne Art Fair offers everything for seasoned collectors, art enthusiasts and first time buyers alike.

Gisborne dealer PAULNACHE is excited to be one of four NZ Galleries exhibiting at The Melbourne Art Fair alongside 70+ leading galleries from Australia, the Asia Pacific and beyond, participating in the Fair this August.  Some of the most respected names in contemporary art will showcase the work of over 300 artists working across a range of media.

Tickets to the Melbourne Art Fair are still on sale. Tickets are limited and advanced bookings are recommended.

For more information visit melbourneartfair.com.au

James R Ford's inaugural solo with Gisborne dealer PAULNACHE

James R Ford in conjunction with PAULNACHE, Gisborne, NZ presents... 

lol·ly·gag

  • intransitive verb \ˈlä-lē-ˌgag\
  • : to spend time doing things that are not useful or serious : to fool around and waste time

Forever playfully exploring the intimate relationships between physical media and everyday life: James R Ford’s investigations into, and reflections on, existential nature and the use of conventional materials and modes of presentation reveal countless nuanced contradictions as well as a fascination with process and the filling in of time. While mostly a creator of laboured drawings, well considered objects and videos, Ford also provides us with scenarios that have us pondering over the mundane and/or acting out the absurd as he invites us to look deeper into his works and what is taking place around us.

There are several strands to the concept behind these works, but all question the nature of the artwork and our perception therein. The exhibition title, Lollygag, was chosen as the works on show may appear to be foolish or useless on first glance. The idea here is to look at how we spend our time, what is considered a waste of time, and how thought alone can bring worth to something seemingly “worth nothing”.  Nothing as in empty, or the act of doing nothing (being idle, waiting, worrying), or the relative importance of an gesture or the worth of the artwork itself (nothing to offer, waste of time, pointless).

Bertrand Russell, from the essay  “In Praise of Idleness”, says “Time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.” This can be applied to the time spent producing the artworks, or the time used by the viewer in looking and contemplating them. Where do “wastes of time” sit in your hierarchy of needs? Maybe we all need some things we don’t need for the subsequent virtue or pleasure they can bestow. The exhibition will consist of a new body of work including film, drawing and object assemblage. With Hat Stand (Waiting for Godot) Ford invites viewers to try on and swap the hats on display, assuming other identities or personas, especially if you find yourself waiting for something. 

  • Opening: Friday, 4th of July, 6:00PM at PAULNACHE Upstairs 89 Grey St Gisborne,  NZ
  • Exhibition: 4th-26th July 2014

James R Ford (b. 1980, UK) studied at Goldsmiths College in London and currently lives and works in Wellington. He has exhibited widely throughout New Zealand and overseas and in 2013 was winner of the inaugural Tui McLauchlan Emerging Artist's Award from the New Zealand Academy of Fine Arts. In 2014 Ford published a book of selected works, with accompanying texts, interviews and essays from 2008-2013, entitled Fail Better.

Whakaora at Whakatane Museum

Whakatane Museum presents a rare opportunity to watch the laying down of multi-coloured sands by Jamjang Sherab and Karma Gyasey, monks from the Jam Tse Dhargyey Tibetan Buddhist Centre in Northland, as they create a medicine mandala -  a circular figure representing the universe in Hindu and Buddhist symbolism. Timed to salute the completion of the Whakatāne Hospital redevelopment, Whakaora also includes works on the theme of healing by national and local artists including work by Gallery artists Dion Hitchens, James Ormsby, Ben Pearce and James R Ford

The dissolution ceremony is 2.30PM this Sunday; blessings, the mandala is destroyed, swept up and then there is a procession down to put it into the river. All welcome!

Whakatane Museum, Opus Gallery: 15 Jun 2014 - 10 Aug 2014 

http://www.whakatanemuseum.org.nz

Photographs by Kay Boreham, Museum and Arts Exhibition Co-ordinator and courtesy of Whakatane Museum. 

2014 London Biennale Pollination in Las Vegas

Jevijoe Vitug's  'VIVAYLAN'  and Anothony Bondi's  'Iron Curtain' . Photograph: JK Russ

Jevijoe Vitug's 'VIVAYLAN' and Anothony Bondi's 'Iron Curtain'. Photograph: JK Russ

The London Biennale project was founded in 1998 by David Medalla, a Filipino conceptual artist based in London, who assigns the theme for each year’s biennale. The event aims to challenge and transform the notion of the art world ‘biennale’ as a large state or corporate-sponsored event with artists selected by curators based on their geographical location, citizenship, nationality, race and ethnicity by throwing open borders and encouraging a more intimate and community-based dialogue between the artists and audiences. Over the years, the London Biennale has expanded with simultaneous satellite events taking place in Paris, Rio de Janeiro, Rome, Berlin, New York, Boston and Las Vegas.

At this year’s London Biennale Pollination in Las Vegas, attendees literallyget lost in art. The multi-artist constructed exhibition, emerging as a satellite event from the London Biennale, features the theme “Maps, Mazes and Mysteries” writes Eleni Parashos for vrated.com.

Amongst those involved are Matthew Couper, JK Russ and Jevijoe Vitug. Couper, a New Zealand native and local [Las Vegas] artist, curated the London Biennale Pollination in Las Vegas with fellow artist and writer Vitug. He says the theme, although developed as an international concept by London Biennale creator David Medalla, has deep roots in Las Vegas.

“Vegas changes often, to the point where a map becomes useless after a few months,” Couper said. “It’s a city that operates as a changing structure and generates a lot of mystery for the people who come here. It’s an easy place to get lost.” 

http://www.londonbiennale2014.tk

Peter Adsett at The Melbourne Art Fair

Adsett, Gisborne, 2013. IMG X Tom Teutenberg

Born in Gisborne, New Zealand, in 1959, Peter Adsett has lived and worked in Australia since 1981, developing his painting practice.  He exhibits regularly in both countries, and has had shows overseas in New York and Boston. 

His academic credentials include an MFA from the Northern Territory University, and a PhD from Australian National University.  In 2001 he was awarded a grant from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation and enjoyed residencies in the International Studio and Curatorial Program in New York, and the McDowell Colony in New Hampshire. Adsett’s work is held in institutions and museums in Australia, New Zealand and Japan.

Adsett has devoted twenty years now to an investigation of abstraction, and like such iconic figures as Richard Serra and Robert Ryman, he proves the enterprise to be one of great, untapped potential.  One could even view Adsett’s art as a critique of abstract painting from the early 20th century to today, a task that became further complicated when he confronted the art of Indigenous Australians - what many believe is the most powerful painting produced today.

On 2000 he completed a series of large-scale acrylic paintings in collaboration with the Gija artist, Rusty Peters.  The resulting exhibition of fourteen works (seven each), titled Two Laws, One Big Spirit travelled around Australia and New Zealand.

In 2009, Adsett built a house/studio in southern Victoria that was the fruit of another collaboration, this time with a New Zealand architect, Sam Kebbell.  The innovative and much admired building (now housing Adsett and his family) is regarded as a “dialogue between painting and architecture.”  

This is the direction currently being explored in the works for the 2014 Melbourne Art Fair. Whilst he would maintain that his paintings always “take on the wall”, Adsett’s recent work engages with this proposition explicitly.  Furthermore, in 'Room with a View' the viewer will discover a degree of wit and humour, latent in much of his earlier work, but now coming to the fore with zest.


Mary Alice Lee


Peter Adsett is represented by Gisborne dealer Paul Nache. 

Humbug tour at The Melbourne Art Fair

ARTIST STUDIO AND PRIVATE COLLECTION TOUR: PAULNACHE PRESENTS PETER ADSETT'S HUMBUG

SUNDAY 17 AUGUST | 9:30AM -12:30PM

Collector Pass holders only. Login to RSVP.
Join this private collection and artist studio tour of Humbug House, a collaboration between Peter Adsett (artist), Sam Kebbell (Kebbell Daish Architects) and Mary Alice Lee (art historian/ writer), and discover how architecture and painting create a dialogue to something extraordinary.

Read Matt Ward's review in Australian Design Review

Photographs by Sonia Mangiapane. Courtesy of the artist and PAULNACHE

What price the environment?

Scott Gardiner photographed by Phil Scott, Gisborne June 2014

Scott Gardiner photographed by Phil Scott, Gisborne June 2014

Scott Gardiner's new exhibition, Yield Point, has continued his exploration of environmental consciousness and mortality. “I became suffocated by an unyielding fixation on labour and process . . . it got to the point where the labour began to define the work and the image became almost secondary to the process,” Gardiner explains to Gisborne Herald's Arts writer Kristine Walsh. “I felt it was important to turn that around and have the ability to experiment with scale, new media and techniques.” Read the full article. 

The Artist As Peasant

PAULNACHE is exhibiting Matthew Couper at the 2013 Auckland Art Fair who is described by Huffington Post's John Seed as "an artist with a Kafkaesque view of the world whose imagery suggests a pagan Catholic Cirque du Soleil". The artist will deliver a solo performance each day of the art fair as a painting monkey, accompanied by a recent suite of work from his Las Vegas studio.

In Search for the Source of Living

A hand powered street cart that could turn into a boat, designed specifically for disabled vendor; Jevijoe Vitug's project is about using appropriate technology for everyday survival and climate change. Excerpt taken from his documentation 'In Search for the Source of Living', Philippines, 2010. Vitug is featured in Matthew Couper's curated group show 'Parallel Lines' scheduled for Paul Nache Gallery, September 2013. 

Parallel Lines

'All I want is 20-20 vision / A total portrait with no omissions' - Blondie, ‘Picture This’, Parallel Lines LP, 1978

'All I want is 20-20 vision / A total portrait with no omissions' - Blondie, ‘Picture This’, Parallel Lines LP, 1978

Parallel Lines brings together the seemingly disparate works of artists represented by PAULNACHE in Gisborne, New Zealand. The installation of artworks create a visual representation of timelines, slipstreams, jet-steams, tracks and paths alluding to the variable ways that artists interact visually, conceptually, locally and globally. Much like Jorge Luis Borges’s seminal short story The Garden of Forking Paths, where a multiplicity of narratives run together to create a hypertext structure, Parallel Lines traces multiple narratives around the perimeter of the gallery walls and in turn creates a wider narrative pursuing concepts of glocalization - a newly coined term, blending globalization and localization referring to the concept of individual, group organization, product or services that reflect not only global standards but also local aspects. The artists represented in the exhibition and by PAULNACHE act on this premise of glocalization with artists living throughout New Zealand and abroad in Berlin, Melbourne, Las Vegas, Manila and Mumbai, but all returning to the provincial East Coast city of Gisborne in New Zealand to test and trial their art in the context of PAULNACHE. 
 
The exhibition features artists Evan Woodruffe, Star Gossage, Matt Summers, Justin Jade Morgan, Mark Braunias, Brian Campbell, Matt Arbuckle, Scott Gardiner, Valerie Bos, Jevijoe Vitug, Rob McLeod, Ben Pearce, Ria Camp, Sanjay Theodore, Sam Kiyoumarsi, Clive Kelly, John Pule, John Walsh, Arie Hellendoorn, Geoff Tune, Bill Riley, Dion Hitchens, James Ormsby and Matthew Couper.

Celebrated Photographer to hold Back-to-Back Exhibitions

'Washday at the Pa', Published school journal

'Washday at the Pa', Published school journal

Following on from their success at the Auckland Art Fair 2013, {Suite} Gallery and PAULNACHE present “Back-to-Back Exhibitions” in Wellington and Gisborne, by iconic New Zealand photographer Ans Westra. On show in Gisborne will be ‘East Coast Show’, a selection of b/w images made on the East Coast during the 1960s – 80s. Included in this exhibition is an early self-portrait of the artist and several images from Ans’ seminal 1963 series Washday at the Pa.